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The Economist

Oct 01 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The Prince • How to make sense of China’s enigmatic ruler—and the threat he poses at home and abroad

How not to run a country • Liz Truss’s new government may already be dead in the water

Baloney ballots • Phoney polls do not make Ukrainian land Russian, whatever Vladimir Putin says

The rate shock • Markets are reeling from higher interest rates. The world economy is next

All talk, no trousers • The fundamental contradictions of esg are being laid bare

Is this time different? • If the protests gather momentum, there is no knowing how they will end

Letters

Xi Jinping The Prince among princelings • Xi Jinping is the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao. The Economist has spent nine months exploring what shapes his thinking

A chronicle of gridlock foretold • WASHINGTON, DCWhat would Republicans do with a House majority?

Unnatural disaster • A devastating hurricane tests the Sunshine State

The joy of roundabouts • CARMEL, INDIANAGrowth is popular, if it is well planned

The new swing voters • WASHINGTON, DCThe most sought-after voters are young, urban Hispanic men

Forgotten men • NEW YORKTrump counties are recovering faster than Biden counties

Back to the bench • NEW YORKClashes over gay rights, affirmative action and elections promise a noisy term

The style of a Democrat • John Fetterman is a savvy politician. His party can learn from him

Are the polls right? • SÃO PAULOPollsters say President Jair Bolsonaro will lose. But their methods are under fire

Peru’s degraded politics • An incompetent president, a discredited Congress and a lack of parties

Moments of silence • TOKYOAbe Shinzo’s state funeral has divided the country and battered the popularity of Kishida Fumio

Capital punishment • ALMATYGuess which city holds the record for the most name changes?

Hostel to fortune • SYDNEYAustralia needs foreign backpackers to come back

Electric storm • SEOULA failure of diplomacy and planning sparks anger in South Korea

Global guru • India’s government is exporting its Hindu nationalism

Who will be the next economic tsar? • HONG KONGAs Liu He, one of Xi Jinping’s most important advisers, leaves the scene, we consider possible successors

Procreative differences • BEIJINGChina is trying to get people to have more babies. Its efforts may be in vain

China tires of covid controls • The example of Prohibition in America should worry the party

Dispatch from a forgotten war • IRUMU, MUTWANGA AND TCHEGERAThe government says martial law has restored a degree of calm. Yet 5.5m people are still too afraid to return to their homes

Women lead the way • DUBAIMany Iranians want to shed the ruling ayatollahs, but it will not be easy

Swamped by English • DUBAIGovernments can do little to reverse the decline of their native tongue

Nothing to celebrate • HRYHORYIVKA, ZAPORIZHIAPutin stages four fake referendums in occupied Ukraine

The very long winter • Europe is focused on surviving this winter, but 2023 may be just as bad

The F-word • FLORENCEItaly chooses a party with a neo-fascist legacy

Steady on • PARISFrance still needs to get a grip on public spending

Going for a bong • The global trade in church bells, and Germany’s role in it

Auf wiedersehen, pact • Europe’s plan for laxer...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The Prince • How to make sense of China’s enigmatic ruler—and the threat he poses at home and abroad

How not to run a country • Liz Truss’s new government may already be dead in the water

Baloney ballots • Phoney polls do not make Ukrainian land Russian, whatever Vladimir Putin says

The rate shock • Markets are reeling from higher interest rates. The world economy is next

All talk, no trousers • The fundamental contradictions of esg are being laid bare

Is this time different? • If the protests gather momentum, there is no knowing how they will end

Letters

Xi Jinping The Prince among princelings • Xi Jinping is the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao. The Economist has spent nine months exploring what shapes his thinking

A chronicle of gridlock foretold • WASHINGTON, DCWhat would Republicans do with a House majority?

Unnatural disaster • A devastating hurricane tests the Sunshine State

The joy of roundabouts • CARMEL, INDIANAGrowth is popular, if it is well planned

The new swing voters • WASHINGTON, DCThe most sought-after voters are young, urban Hispanic men

Forgotten men • NEW YORKTrump counties are recovering faster than Biden counties

Back to the bench • NEW YORKClashes over gay rights, affirmative action and elections promise a noisy term

The style of a Democrat • John Fetterman is a savvy politician. His party can learn from him

Are the polls right? • SÃO PAULOPollsters say President Jair Bolsonaro will lose. But their methods are under fire

Peru’s degraded politics • An incompetent president, a discredited Congress and a lack of parties

Moments of silence • TOKYOAbe Shinzo’s state funeral has divided the country and battered the popularity of Kishida Fumio

Capital punishment • ALMATYGuess which city holds the record for the most name changes?

Hostel to fortune • SYDNEYAustralia needs foreign backpackers to come back

Electric storm • SEOULA failure of diplomacy and planning sparks anger in South Korea

Global guru • India’s government is exporting its Hindu nationalism

Who will be the next economic tsar? • HONG KONGAs Liu He, one of Xi Jinping’s most important advisers, leaves the scene, we consider possible successors

Procreative differences • BEIJINGChina is trying to get people to have more babies. Its efforts may be in vain

China tires of covid controls • The example of Prohibition in America should worry the party

Dispatch from a forgotten war • IRUMU, MUTWANGA AND TCHEGERAThe government says martial law has restored a degree of calm. Yet 5.5m people are still too afraid to return to their homes

Women lead the way • DUBAIMany Iranians want to shed the ruling ayatollahs, but it will not be easy

Swamped by English • DUBAIGovernments can do little to reverse the decline of their native tongue

Nothing to celebrate • HRYHORYIVKA, ZAPORIZHIAPutin stages four fake referendums in occupied Ukraine

The very long winter • Europe is focused on surviving this winter, but 2023 may be just as bad

The F-word • FLORENCEItaly chooses a party with a neo-fascist legacy

Steady on • PARISFrance still needs to get a grip on public spending

Going for a bong • The global trade in church bells, and Germany’s role in it

Auf wiedersehen, pact • Europe’s plan for laxer...


Expand title description text