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The Economist

Jul 30 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

How to deal with despots • Western foreign policy sets out to be ethical, but often ends up being ineffectual

The hard road back • The new president must persuade his suffering people to endure more pain

After the recession • Lower inflation and greener energy are worth the price of a short downturn

Cloudburst • The era of big-tech exceptionalism may be over

Stopping Somalis from starving • Saving lives will involve talking to terrorists

Letters

A dark state • Vladimir Putin is in thrall to a distinctive brand of Russian fascism. That is why his country is such a threat to Ukraine, the West and his own people

Not coming to America • WASHINGTON, DC A shortfall in immigration has become an economic problem

Green-card blues • CHICAGOAmerica’s legal-immigration system remains gummed up

Return fire • SACRAMENTOA new gun law in California takes aim at a Texan abortion law

Deus ex Manchina • WASHINGTON, DC After a senator’s reversal, Democratic hopes for a spending bill are revived

In search of evidence • Some paediatricians question their professional association’s guidance

The gerontocrats • Democrats are overdue for a new generation of leaders. In Congress one may be about to arrive

All hat, no cattle • LIMA One of Latin America’s most politically volatile countries is getting worse

The fuel and the fire • Latin America’s energy subsidies are good politics but bad policy

Obstacle course • COLOMBO The past year has been miserable for Sri Lankans. The next one will be even worse

A fine balance • Pakistan may be able to avoid a full-blown crisis, if everything goes right

Desperate measures • SINGAPORE The junta’s generals bring back the death penalty

Speaking terms • SYDNEY The two countries are mending fences—up to a point

Presidented • India’s Hindu-nationalist ruling party preaches social inclusion

Showing more bottle • PRAGUE In a continent once keen on close ties with China, views have grown much warier

Hunger in the Horn • NAIROBI Somalia stands on the brink of famine. The war in Ukraine is making things worse

Drilling into the world’s lungs • DAKAR An oil auction in Congo bodes ill for the climate

Nasty tsarist vibrations • JERUSALEM Israel’s neutrality over the war in Ukraine may be fraying

Weighty matters • BAGHDAD Why women in the Middle East are fatter than men

A nationalist turn • ROME After Mario Draghi resigns, Italy looks set to swing right

Taking it back • MYKOLAIV Ukraine gathers strength for an assault on Kherson

Fragile pact • ODESSA, ISTANBUL AND WASHINGTON, DC A deal on Ukrainian exports may yet stick

Cutting calories • BERLIN An eu energy diet to beat Russian cuts

Putin’s false piety • Enlisting an icon in a gruesome war

Delayed reaction • PARIS French nuclear power is down at just the wrong time

Dreadneedle Street • The central bank must weather high inflation and meddling politicians

Happy champing • COOLINGOne way to keep empty churches in use: camp beds by the altar

Red line • The first government veto of a Chinese investment presages more to come

The unlikely dove • BELFAST David Trimble, an architect of the Good Friday Agreement, died on July 25th

More than hot air • Britain’s hydrogen strategy is...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

How to deal with despots • Western foreign policy sets out to be ethical, but often ends up being ineffectual

The hard road back • The new president must persuade his suffering people to endure more pain

After the recession • Lower inflation and greener energy are worth the price of a short downturn

Cloudburst • The era of big-tech exceptionalism may be over

Stopping Somalis from starving • Saving lives will involve talking to terrorists

Letters

A dark state • Vladimir Putin is in thrall to a distinctive brand of Russian fascism. That is why his country is such a threat to Ukraine, the West and his own people

Not coming to America • WASHINGTON, DC A shortfall in immigration has become an economic problem

Green-card blues • CHICAGOAmerica’s legal-immigration system remains gummed up

Return fire • SACRAMENTOA new gun law in California takes aim at a Texan abortion law

Deus ex Manchina • WASHINGTON, DC After a senator’s reversal, Democratic hopes for a spending bill are revived

In search of evidence • Some paediatricians question their professional association’s guidance

The gerontocrats • Democrats are overdue for a new generation of leaders. In Congress one may be about to arrive

All hat, no cattle • LIMA One of Latin America’s most politically volatile countries is getting worse

The fuel and the fire • Latin America’s energy subsidies are good politics but bad policy

Obstacle course • COLOMBO The past year has been miserable for Sri Lankans. The next one will be even worse

A fine balance • Pakistan may be able to avoid a full-blown crisis, if everything goes right

Desperate measures • SINGAPORE The junta’s generals bring back the death penalty

Speaking terms • SYDNEY The two countries are mending fences—up to a point

Presidented • India’s Hindu-nationalist ruling party preaches social inclusion

Showing more bottle • PRAGUE In a continent once keen on close ties with China, views have grown much warier

Hunger in the Horn • NAIROBI Somalia stands on the brink of famine. The war in Ukraine is making things worse

Drilling into the world’s lungs • DAKAR An oil auction in Congo bodes ill for the climate

Nasty tsarist vibrations • JERUSALEM Israel’s neutrality over the war in Ukraine may be fraying

Weighty matters • BAGHDAD Why women in the Middle East are fatter than men

A nationalist turn • ROME After Mario Draghi resigns, Italy looks set to swing right

Taking it back • MYKOLAIV Ukraine gathers strength for an assault on Kherson

Fragile pact • ODESSA, ISTANBUL AND WASHINGTON, DC A deal on Ukrainian exports may yet stick

Cutting calories • BERLIN An eu energy diet to beat Russian cuts

Putin’s false piety • Enlisting an icon in a gruesome war

Delayed reaction • PARIS French nuclear power is down at just the wrong time

Dreadneedle Street • The central bank must weather high inflation and meddling politicians

Happy champing • COOLINGOne way to keep empty churches in use: camp beds by the altar

Red line • The first government veto of a Chinese investment presages more to come

The unlikely dove • BELFAST David Trimble, an architect of the Good Friday Agreement, died on July 25th

More than hot air • Britain’s hydrogen strategy is...


Expand title description text