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The Economist

Jul 02 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

The world this week Politics

Business

How to win the long war • After doing well early in the war, Ukraine is losing ground. What next?

After the shattering of Roe • America needs to find a better way to resolve its thorniest issues

The reckoning • The startup bust is bad, but not as bad as the dotcom fiasco

A new order in Asia • Singapore is on top in Asian finance. The biggest risks to its primacy are at home

Mexico’s shame • Staggering numbers of Mexicans are disappearing. Here’s how to save some of them

Letters

Briefing The long warOn and on • KYIVDoes a protracted conflict favour Russia or Ukraine?

The fallout from overturning Roe • WASHINGTON, DCIn an even more divided America, the battle over abortion goes on

An end-of-term report • NEW YORKThe scope of change flowing from the court’s rulings has been staggering

Win one, lose one • NEW YORKOne branch of government passes gun reform, another rejects a gun law

Where have all the lifeguards gone? • THE JERSEY SHOREA shortage means many pools and beaches may be closed or unmanned

Questions of trust • SANTA FENew Mexico offers a warning of election battles to come

A tragedy in Texas • NEW YORKWhy more migrants have been dying

The courage of a conservative • Even without Donald Trump, says our departing columnist, the Republican Party may be unreformable

100,000 missing Mexicans • PUEBLA AND SALTILLOMany victims of the drug war lie in unmarked graves in the desert

Rain strain • SÃO PAULOMore Brazilians are dying in floods and downpours

Open and shut • SINGAPOREResentment of rich foreigners and worries about inequality complicate the city-state’s role as a financial hub

On the edge • SINGAPOREThe country’s finances are in trouble, but it may yet turn the corner

Feeling the chill • The government celebrates democracy abroad and locks up critics at home

Indomitable valley • BAZARAKNorth-east Afghanistan resumes its fight against an old enemy

Memory loss • Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, a kleptocrat’s son, takes over the Philippines

Three steps to heaven • China still claims to be moving towards communism. Some want it to pick up the pace

Low school • HONG KONGChina is improving its human capital. Gradually

Holes in the great firewall • BEIJINGAs censorship in China increases, vpns are becoming more important

Speakeasies v snitches • SHANGHAIGetting around covid controls in China’s biggest city

Echoes of war • NAIROBIThe return of regional rivalry endangers eastern Congo

Digital stevedores • KAMPALAAfrica’s mobile-money agents face an uncertain future

One shield to guard them all? • JERUSALEMIsrael has joined an unexpected alliance with former foes

Safer at last • DUBAIThe un needs more money to defuse a bomb and avert a famine in Yemen

The great moustache comeback • BAGHDADFacial fur is again a matter of style, not safety

Back in business • MADRIDThe Atlantic alliance holds its most important summit in decades

Nest of vipers • KYIVThe battle for Snake Island

The quiet German • BERLINGermany’s chancellor takes taciturnity to new levels

Changing friends • BELGRADEThe war is forcing pro-Russian Balkan leaders to recalibrate

Jacket, tie, nationalism • PARISFresh faces on the far right and left fill...


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OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

The world this week Politics

Business

How to win the long war • After doing well early in the war, Ukraine is losing ground. What next?

After the shattering of Roe • America needs to find a better way to resolve its thorniest issues

The reckoning • The startup bust is bad, but not as bad as the dotcom fiasco

A new order in Asia • Singapore is on top in Asian finance. The biggest risks to its primacy are at home

Mexico’s shame • Staggering numbers of Mexicans are disappearing. Here’s how to save some of them

Letters

Briefing The long warOn and on • KYIVDoes a protracted conflict favour Russia or Ukraine?

The fallout from overturning Roe • WASHINGTON, DCIn an even more divided America, the battle over abortion goes on

An end-of-term report • NEW YORKThe scope of change flowing from the court’s rulings has been staggering

Win one, lose one • NEW YORKOne branch of government passes gun reform, another rejects a gun law

Where have all the lifeguards gone? • THE JERSEY SHOREA shortage means many pools and beaches may be closed or unmanned

Questions of trust • SANTA FENew Mexico offers a warning of election battles to come

A tragedy in Texas • NEW YORKWhy more migrants have been dying

The courage of a conservative • Even without Donald Trump, says our departing columnist, the Republican Party may be unreformable

100,000 missing Mexicans • PUEBLA AND SALTILLOMany victims of the drug war lie in unmarked graves in the desert

Rain strain • SÃO PAULOMore Brazilians are dying in floods and downpours

Open and shut • SINGAPOREResentment of rich foreigners and worries about inequality complicate the city-state’s role as a financial hub

On the edge • SINGAPOREThe country’s finances are in trouble, but it may yet turn the corner

Feeling the chill • The government celebrates democracy abroad and locks up critics at home

Indomitable valley • BAZARAKNorth-east Afghanistan resumes its fight against an old enemy

Memory loss • Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, a kleptocrat’s son, takes over the Philippines

Three steps to heaven • China still claims to be moving towards communism. Some want it to pick up the pace

Low school • HONG KONGChina is improving its human capital. Gradually

Holes in the great firewall • BEIJINGAs censorship in China increases, vpns are becoming more important

Speakeasies v snitches • SHANGHAIGetting around covid controls in China’s biggest city

Echoes of war • NAIROBIThe return of regional rivalry endangers eastern Congo

Digital stevedores • KAMPALAAfrica’s mobile-money agents face an uncertain future

One shield to guard them all? • JERUSALEMIsrael has joined an unexpected alliance with former foes

Safer at last • DUBAIThe un needs more money to defuse a bomb and avert a famine in Yemen

The great moustache comeback • BAGHDADFacial fur is again a matter of style, not safety

Back in business • MADRIDThe Atlantic alliance holds its most important summit in decades

Nest of vipers • KYIVThe battle for Snake Island

The quiet German • BERLINGermany’s chancellor takes taciturnity to new levels

Changing friends • BELGRADEThe war is forcing pro-Russian Balkan leaders to recalibrate

Jacket, tie, nationalism • PARISFresh faces on the far right and left fill...


Expand title description text