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The Economist

Jun 04 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week

A new nuclear era • With his threats to use the bomb, Russia’s president has overturned the nuclear order

America’s next recession • A downturn looks likely. It stands to be mild but messy

Into the unknown • A presidential run-off between an ex-guerrilla and a TikTok populist puts a stable country at risk

Surmounting great barriers • To save some ecosystems, humans must intervene more, not less

Put out more bunting • Why the queen’s 70 years on the throne are worth celebrating

Letters

Thinking the unthinkable • The war in Ukraine is unlikely to go nuclear. But it is increasing the risk that future conflicts will

The not-so-super market • BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS

Mall makeovers • WASHINGTON, DC

Hey, big spender • LOS ANGELES

The religious majority • WASHINGTON, DC

Adjusting their sights • HOUSTON

Policing differently • ALBUQUERQUE AND SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO

The zombie nuclear deal • Iran’s defunct nuclear-containment pact has contaminated American politics

Fight the power company • HUARAZ

The great rain robbery • HUALCÁN

A change is gonna come • BOGOTÁ

Interfering Imran • DELHI

The rights of one man • ALMATY

Powering up • BUSAN

Knock-on effects • MANILA

Steaming ahead • SINGAPORE

Incredible hulks • The luxury of Asia’s malls is no substitute for genuine public spaces

Imperfect spies • China’s spooks are good at hacking and harassing dissidents. But in other areas they have a lot to learn

Treasured islands • China’s interest in the Pacific islands is growing. But they have their own interests

Down with the tyrants • The dark side of China’s property boom

Xi bans grumbling by party elders • Party factions were annoying to China’s past leaders, but offered a safe outlet for dissent

Better luck this time • MOGADISHU

Roads to hell • NAIROBI

Inequality before the law • NAIROBI

More than just business buddies • MARRAKECH

The battle for Severodonetsk • KYIV

Tragedy on Shakespeare Street • KHARKIV

Getting the upgrade • WASHINGTON, DC

The reluctant giant • BERLIN

For hedgehogs, not road hogs • CHAGNY

Squabbling in unison • Concerns over European disunity are overdone—for now

Separation anxiety • Britain’s highest court takes a conservative turn

What changed? • The prime minister’s position looks more precarious

Survival of the bookish • BASANTPUR, NEPAL; KITUI, KENYA; AND PENANG, MALAYSIA

On her CEO’s secret service • Spying in business is entering a worrying new era. Companies need to take it more seriously

Patent aggression • Intellectual property is another casualty of the war

Leaning out • SAN FRANCISCO

“Top Gun” takes off • A high-flying debut at the box office sparks hopes of a theatrical recovery

Hire hurdles • SAN FRANCISCO

Your whole self • And why you really should not bring it to work

Powerless proxies • The golden age for the dispensers of shareholder counsel is over

The shape of things to come • WASHINGTON, DC

Crude calculations • Why oil is spiking again

Growth v debt • SHANGHAI

Balance of payments • Could a shift from goods to services ease...


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Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week

A new nuclear era • With his threats to use the bomb, Russia’s president has overturned the nuclear order

America’s next recession • A downturn looks likely. It stands to be mild but messy

Into the unknown • A presidential run-off between an ex-guerrilla and a TikTok populist puts a stable country at risk

Surmounting great barriers • To save some ecosystems, humans must intervene more, not less

Put out more bunting • Why the queen’s 70 years on the throne are worth celebrating

Letters

Thinking the unthinkable • The war in Ukraine is unlikely to go nuclear. But it is increasing the risk that future conflicts will

The not-so-super market • BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS

Mall makeovers • WASHINGTON, DC

Hey, big spender • LOS ANGELES

The religious majority • WASHINGTON, DC

Adjusting their sights • HOUSTON

Policing differently • ALBUQUERQUE AND SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO

The zombie nuclear deal • Iran’s defunct nuclear-containment pact has contaminated American politics

Fight the power company • HUARAZ

The great rain robbery • HUALCÁN

A change is gonna come • BOGOTÁ

Interfering Imran • DELHI

The rights of one man • ALMATY

Powering up • BUSAN

Knock-on effects • MANILA

Steaming ahead • SINGAPORE

Incredible hulks • The luxury of Asia’s malls is no substitute for genuine public spaces

Imperfect spies • China’s spooks are good at hacking and harassing dissidents. But in other areas they have a lot to learn

Treasured islands • China’s interest in the Pacific islands is growing. But they have their own interests

Down with the tyrants • The dark side of China’s property boom

Xi bans grumbling by party elders • Party factions were annoying to China’s past leaders, but offered a safe outlet for dissent

Better luck this time • MOGADISHU

Roads to hell • NAIROBI

Inequality before the law • NAIROBI

More than just business buddies • MARRAKECH

The battle for Severodonetsk • KYIV

Tragedy on Shakespeare Street • KHARKIV

Getting the upgrade • WASHINGTON, DC

The reluctant giant • BERLIN

For hedgehogs, not road hogs • CHAGNY

Squabbling in unison • Concerns over European disunity are overdone—for now

Separation anxiety • Britain’s highest court takes a conservative turn

What changed? • The prime minister’s position looks more precarious

Survival of the bookish • BASANTPUR, NEPAL; KITUI, KENYA; AND PENANG, MALAYSIA

On her CEO’s secret service • Spying in business is entering a worrying new era. Companies need to take it more seriously

Patent aggression • Intellectual property is another casualty of the war

Leaning out • SAN FRANCISCO

“Top Gun” takes off • A high-flying debut at the box office sparks hopes of a theatrical recovery

Hire hurdles • SAN FRANCISCO

Your whole self • And why you really should not bring it to work

Powerless proxies • The golden age for the dispensers of shareholder counsel is over

The shape of things to come • WASHINGTON, DC

Crude calculations • Why oil is spiking again

Growth v debt • SHANGHAI

Balance of payments • Could a shift from goods to services ease...


Expand title description text