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The Economist

May 14 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week

India’s next decade • The Indian economy is being rewired. The opportunity is immense—and so are the stakes

Grisly reality • Getting to the bottom of the plunge in America’s stockmarket

The professional panopticon • Look out, office workers. You are being watched—by your boss

Gota go • Sri Lanka is on the brink of collapse. The president must resign

Private letters, public promise • Britain’s plan for whole-genome sequencing of newborns poses ethical quandaries

Letters

A new formula • BANGALORE, DELHI AND MUMBAI

Voting wars • ATLANTA

Stolen children • CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

The concrete jungle • SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS, CALIFORNIA

Meanness to migrants • WASHINGTON, DC

Delayed justice • NEW YORK

High maintenance • EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

Donald Trump’s brutal turn • Mark Esper’s memoir of the dying months of the Trump administration is a frightening read

The cross on the ballot • BELO HORIZONTE

Crack on • SÃO PAULO

Staying alive • Colombia’s tragic history of political murder still haunts the country

Saffron nation • DELHI

The morning after • COLOMBO

For whom the teals poll • SYDNEY

State of emergency • SEOUL

One-way street • The Taliban crave recognition but refuse to do anything to earn it

Base case • KUNIGAMI, OKINAWA

Stay neutral, love the party • An imminent change of leadership hints at China’s wariness of Hong Kong’s bureaucratic elite

The never-ending lockdown • SHANGHAI

Taming the waters • BEIJING

Victims, not vectors • BEIJING

A self-repressing society • Xi Jinping sees strengths in Maoist tools of social control

Savings and groan • HARARE

Heiferinflation • SELOUS

Copper-bottomed promises • CAPE TOWN

A death in Jenin • DUBAI

The danger of lighting a gas fire • DUBAI

No ports in a storm • KYIV

Putin’s parade • The Victory Day that wasn’t

A portent or a blip? • BERLIN

NUPES and dupes • PARIS

Back to “Borgen” • A new season of the beloved Danish political series has a darker tone

Fifth time lucky • Europe’s handling of war on its doorstep breaks a decade-long streak of fumbled crises

A hawk on the wing • OVER THE NORTH SEA

Sir Beer Starmer • A late-night beer and curry may end the Labour leader’s career

A progressive prisoner’s dilemma • Labour and the Lib Dems are learning to play nicely with each other

Connective action • BERLIN AND SAN FRANCISCO

Pop! • Tech bubbles are bursting. Some more loudly than others

Can Coupang deliver? • SEOUL

Acing the test • SHANGHAI

Big Brotherly boss • Welcome to the era of the hyper-surveilled office

The woolliest words in business • Innovation. Sustainability. Purpose. Yuck

Where the wild things were • Activist investors are becoming tamer. They must not become extinct

Braced for a storm • Which property markets are most exposed to coming interest-rate rises?

A slow train from China • HONG KONG

Bearing up • Why Russia is on track for a record trade surplus

Public enemy • SAN FRANCISCO

The Italian sob • Anxiety about Italy’s public debts will, like the poor, always be with...


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OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week

India’s next decade • The Indian economy is being rewired. The opportunity is immense—and so are the stakes

Grisly reality • Getting to the bottom of the plunge in America’s stockmarket

The professional panopticon • Look out, office workers. You are being watched—by your boss

Gota go • Sri Lanka is on the brink of collapse. The president must resign

Private letters, public promise • Britain’s plan for whole-genome sequencing of newborns poses ethical quandaries

Letters

A new formula • BANGALORE, DELHI AND MUMBAI

Voting wars • ATLANTA

Stolen children • CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA

The concrete jungle • SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS, CALIFORNIA

Meanness to migrants • WASHINGTON, DC

Delayed justice • NEW YORK

High maintenance • EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

Donald Trump’s brutal turn • Mark Esper’s memoir of the dying months of the Trump administration is a frightening read

The cross on the ballot • BELO HORIZONTE

Crack on • SÃO PAULO

Staying alive • Colombia’s tragic history of political murder still haunts the country

Saffron nation • DELHI

The morning after • COLOMBO

For whom the teals poll • SYDNEY

State of emergency • SEOUL

One-way street • The Taliban crave recognition but refuse to do anything to earn it

Base case • KUNIGAMI, OKINAWA

Stay neutral, love the party • An imminent change of leadership hints at China’s wariness of Hong Kong’s bureaucratic elite

The never-ending lockdown • SHANGHAI

Taming the waters • BEIJING

Victims, not vectors • BEIJING

A self-repressing society • Xi Jinping sees strengths in Maoist tools of social control

Savings and groan • HARARE

Heiferinflation • SELOUS

Copper-bottomed promises • CAPE TOWN

A death in Jenin • DUBAI

The danger of lighting a gas fire • DUBAI

No ports in a storm • KYIV

Putin’s parade • The Victory Day that wasn’t

A portent or a blip? • BERLIN

NUPES and dupes • PARIS

Back to “Borgen” • A new season of the beloved Danish political series has a darker tone

Fifth time lucky • Europe’s handling of war on its doorstep breaks a decade-long streak of fumbled crises

A hawk on the wing • OVER THE NORTH SEA

Sir Beer Starmer • A late-night beer and curry may end the Labour leader’s career

A progressive prisoner’s dilemma • Labour and the Lib Dems are learning to play nicely with each other

Connective action • BERLIN AND SAN FRANCISCO

Pop! • Tech bubbles are bursting. Some more loudly than others

Can Coupang deliver? • SEOUL

Acing the test • SHANGHAI

Big Brotherly boss • Welcome to the era of the hyper-surveilled office

The woolliest words in business • Innovation. Sustainability. Purpose. Yuck

Where the wild things were • Activist investors are becoming tamer. They must not become extinct

Braced for a storm • Which property markets are most exposed to coming interest-rate rises?

A slow train from China • HONG KONG

Bearing up • Why Russia is on track for a record trade surplus

Public enemy • SAN FRANCISCO

The Italian sob • Anxiety about Italy’s public debts will, like the poor, always be with...


Expand title description text