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The Economist

Apr 09 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week

Why Macron matters • France’s president is a cautionary tale for centrists everywhere

To indict is right • Investigate and charge Russian war criminals, even if they are never brought to justice

Recession roulette • A toxic mix of risks hangs over the world economy

Imaginary hobgoblins • Scaremongering works. Fans of the truth should fear it

After the smartphone • In Silicon Valley the search is on for the next big tech platform

Letters

Standing out from the crowd • AMIENS AND PARIS

Fields of gold • RUGBY, NORTH DAKOTA

Confirmation bias • NEW YORK

Not quite primed • STATEN ISLAND, NEW YORK

A lethal shift • WASHINGTON, DC

To pump or not to pump? • FRANKLIN LAKES, NEW JERSEY

Battlegrounds of the baby business • WASHINGTON, DC

Bill Burns and the bear • The CIA director is at the heart of the administration’s capable Ukraine effort

How corrupt was Lula? • SÃO PAULO

Lights out • COLOMBO AND DELHI

Not cricket • ISLAMABAD

Enmeshed • India’s vaunted strategic autonomy is an illusion

Bursting into Hwasong • SEOUL

AUKUS goes hypersonic • A strategic submarine pact turns its attention to a new breed of missiles

Shanghai swoons • SHANGHAI

A new sheriff in town • John Lee, a tough ex-cop, looks set to become Hong Kong’s leader

A big appetite • BEIJING

The history boys • Don’t underestimate Xi Jinping’s ideological bond with Vladimir Putin

After the tyrant • Sudan faces collapse three years after the fall of its genocidal dictator

Wine and punishment • MAPUTO

What would the neighbours think? • CAIRO

Smashed and forgotten • BENGHAZI

Collecting from the wrong people • CAIRO

After the battle • KYIV

The sixth week of war

The turning tide • Ukraine sees a window of opportunity to push Russia back

From battleground to playground • WARSAW

Having it both ways in Istanbul • ANKARA

Unstoppable strongman • Viktor Orban wins again. But his country is increasingly isolated

Vaccinated against Viktor • Hungary cannot shake off Viktor Orban, but the rest of Europe will cope

Just what the doctor ordered • GLOUCESTER

Bluer, greener • Could barges and boats substitute for vans and lorries?

Of moral panics and ethical spasms • Voters upset by the treatment of Ukrainian refugees are getting what they asked for

Vladimir’s army • PARIS

Seeing and believing • Tech firms are betting that “extended reality” glasses could be the next big product—and perhaps the next big platform

Another Musk-have • SAN FRANCISCO

Degrees of unconcern • Bosses with MBAs are good for profits but bad for workers

In search of an ending • TOKYO

Double-entry book-keeping • SHANGHAI

The value of clarity • Clear expectations are the secret to making hybrid work a success

The catfish effect • Save globalisation! Buy a Chinese EV

Too much of a good thing • OMAHA AND PARIS

Goodbye, QE. Hello, QT • WASHINGTON, DC

FOMO froth • WASHINGTON, DC

Double-glazed • Bonds signal recession. Stocks have been buoyant. What gives?

Looking in the side-mirror • HONG KONG

A house united • MUMBAI

Not so...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week

Why Macron matters • France’s president is a cautionary tale for centrists everywhere

To indict is right • Investigate and charge Russian war criminals, even if they are never brought to justice

Recession roulette • A toxic mix of risks hangs over the world economy

Imaginary hobgoblins • Scaremongering works. Fans of the truth should fear it

After the smartphone • In Silicon Valley the search is on for the next big tech platform

Letters

Standing out from the crowd • AMIENS AND PARIS

Fields of gold • RUGBY, NORTH DAKOTA

Confirmation bias • NEW YORK

Not quite primed • STATEN ISLAND, NEW YORK

A lethal shift • WASHINGTON, DC

To pump or not to pump? • FRANKLIN LAKES, NEW JERSEY

Battlegrounds of the baby business • WASHINGTON, DC

Bill Burns and the bear • The CIA director is at the heart of the administration’s capable Ukraine effort

How corrupt was Lula? • SÃO PAULO

Lights out • COLOMBO AND DELHI

Not cricket • ISLAMABAD

Enmeshed • India’s vaunted strategic autonomy is an illusion

Bursting into Hwasong • SEOUL

AUKUS goes hypersonic • A strategic submarine pact turns its attention to a new breed of missiles

Shanghai swoons • SHANGHAI

A new sheriff in town • John Lee, a tough ex-cop, looks set to become Hong Kong’s leader

A big appetite • BEIJING

The history boys • Don’t underestimate Xi Jinping’s ideological bond with Vladimir Putin

After the tyrant • Sudan faces collapse three years after the fall of its genocidal dictator

Wine and punishment • MAPUTO

What would the neighbours think? • CAIRO

Smashed and forgotten • BENGHAZI

Collecting from the wrong people • CAIRO

After the battle • KYIV

The sixth week of war

The turning tide • Ukraine sees a window of opportunity to push Russia back

From battleground to playground • WARSAW

Having it both ways in Istanbul • ANKARA

Unstoppable strongman • Viktor Orban wins again. But his country is increasingly isolated

Vaccinated against Viktor • Hungary cannot shake off Viktor Orban, but the rest of Europe will cope

Just what the doctor ordered • GLOUCESTER

Bluer, greener • Could barges and boats substitute for vans and lorries?

Of moral panics and ethical spasms • Voters upset by the treatment of Ukrainian refugees are getting what they asked for

Vladimir’s army • PARIS

Seeing and believing • Tech firms are betting that “extended reality” glasses could be the next big product—and perhaps the next big platform

Another Musk-have • SAN FRANCISCO

Degrees of unconcern • Bosses with MBAs are good for profits but bad for workers

In search of an ending • TOKYO

Double-entry book-keeping • SHANGHAI

The value of clarity • Clear expectations are the secret to making hybrid work a success

The catfish effect • Save globalisation! Buy a Chinese EV

Too much of a good thing • OMAHA AND PARIS

Goodbye, QE. Hello, QT • WASHINGTON, DC

FOMO froth • WASHINGTON, DC

Double-glazed • Bonds signal recession. Stocks have been buoyant. What gives?

Looking in the side-mirror • HONG KONG

A house united • MUMBAI

Not so...


Expand title description text