Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

The Economist

Feb 26 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week • To 6am GMT February 24th 2022

Where will he stop? • Russia’s president has launched an assault on his neighbour. History will judge him harshly

Wasting a windfall • America’s states have more green stuff than grey matter

The private-equity delusion • Why private markets are likely to disappoint investors

Courting trouble • South Africa must do more to protect its judges

Rise of the robots • The world should welcome the rise of smart machines

Letters

A bad beginning • KYIV, MOSCOW, SLOVYANSK AND WASHINGTON, DC

By invitation

Take the money and run • WASHINGTON, DC

The unexpected governor • NEW YORK

Firefall and footfall • HORSETAIL FALL, YOSEMITE VALLEY

Miserable marriages • WASHINGTON, DC

A pushback against cancel culture • Some students and academics are rethinking university education

Reality against Putin • The administration is countering Russian disinformation on Ukraine

Why Uruguay? • MONTEVIDEO

The price of high prices • SÃO PAULO

The fall of Juan Orlando Hernández • Can Honduras clean up its act?

K-popular • SEOUL

What’s in a name? • Why so many Asian cities adopt an alias

No mercy • LAHORE

The chastened cowboy • KUALA LUMPUR

Fearful symmetry? • The implications of the war in Ukraine for the Asia-Pacific region

Choosing sides • China drew closer to Russia on the eve of war. Will Xi Jinping come to regret it?

Clinging to zero • HONG KONG

A horror from another age • The story of a trafficked bride has shaken China in revealing ways

Judging judges • JOHANNESBURG

Lines in the sand • JACQUEVILLE AND ABIDJAN

Here comes Trouble • JOHANNESBURG AND LILONGWE

Cleaning up the laundromat • ABU DHABI

A ban on the van • CAIRO

Beak demand • The market for falcons is soaring as wild populations decline

Frenemies • ISTANBUL

Bills to pay • PARIS

Holy See-saw • ROME

Thunder on the right • MADRID

Free as air • Controlling the flow of gases, even in canisters, turns out to be tricky

The free-rider continent • Europe thrives by letting others do the legwork—but should wonder if that can last

A more flexible approach • Britain’s post-Brexit trade policy is slowly maturing

A new routine • SOUTHEND-ON-SEA

A tale of two crises • A slow-burn crisis in the NHS could hole the Tories, rather as the financial crisis did Labour

The techno-independence movement • HONG KONG

Perfect storm • HONG KONG

Dirty work • Work confers dignity. But some jobs are also a source of stigma

Culture vultures • Buy-out firms are snapping up America’s newspapers

Burger flip-out • What is Carl Icahn’s beef with McDonald’s?

Reverse gear • Two German carmakers are set to uncouple

Putin’s python • How Gazprom helps the Kremlin put the squeeze on Europe

The economic fallout • Expect inflation, lower growth and disruption to financial markets

Artful dodging • WASHINGTON, DC

Lost and fund • WASHINGTON, DC

Karat and stick • NEW DELHI

Ciao, salotto buono • The retro campaign of two grandees of Italian business

Getting sticky • ISTANBUL

The sun also rises •...


Expand title description text

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week • To 6am GMT February 24th 2022

Where will he stop? • Russia’s president has launched an assault on his neighbour. History will judge him harshly

Wasting a windfall • America’s states have more green stuff than grey matter

The private-equity delusion • Why private markets are likely to disappoint investors

Courting trouble • South Africa must do more to protect its judges

Rise of the robots • The world should welcome the rise of smart machines

Letters

A bad beginning • KYIV, MOSCOW, SLOVYANSK AND WASHINGTON, DC

By invitation

Take the money and run • WASHINGTON, DC

The unexpected governor • NEW YORK

Firefall and footfall • HORSETAIL FALL, YOSEMITE VALLEY

Miserable marriages • WASHINGTON, DC

A pushback against cancel culture • Some students and academics are rethinking university education

Reality against Putin • The administration is countering Russian disinformation on Ukraine

Why Uruguay? • MONTEVIDEO

The price of high prices • SÃO PAULO

The fall of Juan Orlando Hernández • Can Honduras clean up its act?

K-popular • SEOUL

What’s in a name? • Why so many Asian cities adopt an alias

No mercy • LAHORE

The chastened cowboy • KUALA LUMPUR

Fearful symmetry? • The implications of the war in Ukraine for the Asia-Pacific region

Choosing sides • China drew closer to Russia on the eve of war. Will Xi Jinping come to regret it?

Clinging to zero • HONG KONG

A horror from another age • The story of a trafficked bride has shaken China in revealing ways

Judging judges • JOHANNESBURG

Lines in the sand • JACQUEVILLE AND ABIDJAN

Here comes Trouble • JOHANNESBURG AND LILONGWE

Cleaning up the laundromat • ABU DHABI

A ban on the van • CAIRO

Beak demand • The market for falcons is soaring as wild populations decline

Frenemies • ISTANBUL

Bills to pay • PARIS

Holy See-saw • ROME

Thunder on the right • MADRID

Free as air • Controlling the flow of gases, even in canisters, turns out to be tricky

The free-rider continent • Europe thrives by letting others do the legwork—but should wonder if that can last

A more flexible approach • Britain’s post-Brexit trade policy is slowly maturing

A new routine • SOUTHEND-ON-SEA

A tale of two crises • A slow-burn crisis in the NHS could hole the Tories, rather as the financial crisis did Labour

The techno-independence movement • HONG KONG

Perfect storm • HONG KONG

Dirty work • Work confers dignity. But some jobs are also a source of stigma

Culture vultures • Buy-out firms are snapping up America’s newspapers

Burger flip-out • What is Carl Icahn’s beef with McDonald’s?

Reverse gear • Two German carmakers are set to uncouple

Putin’s python • How Gazprom helps the Kremlin put the squeeze on Europe

The economic fallout • Expect inflation, lower growth and disruption to financial markets

Artful dodging • WASHINGTON, DC

Lost and fund • WASHINGTON, DC

Karat and stick • NEW DELHI

Ciao, salotto buono • The retro campaign of two grandees of Italian business

Getting sticky • ISTANBUL

The sun also rises •...


Expand title description text