Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

The Economist

Feb 19 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week • To 6am GMT February 17th 2022

Putin’s botched job • Whether he invades Ukraine or backs down, Russia’s autocratic president has harmed his country

The chicken and the peg • Workers have the most to lose from a wage-price spiral

No, Canada • Justin Trudeau has handled vaccine protests atrociously

Factional dissipation • The malaise at the heart of the Conservatives

An injection of reality • To build a vaccine industry, Africa must embrace the private sector

Letters

A grim look out • MOSCOW

Watching the border • LOW EARTH ORBIT

Between a rock and a hard place • OROVADA, NEVADA

Total recall • SAN FRANCISCO

Going overboard • SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

Not yet signed, sealed or delivered • ELMORE, VERMONT

Hard-tech heartland • CHICAGO

The fight for Catholic America • Pope Francis is starting to get a grip on the world’s fourth-biggest Catholic country

No truck with Trudeau • OTTAWA

The mansion and the first son • Allegations about his offspring could undermine Mexico’s president

The limits of aid • Humanitarian assistance is no substitute for a functioning economy

Awamori? Go on then • YONAGUNI

A million ways to die in the east • DELHI

Cut-rate khanate • ALMATY

Littoral, but not serious enough • Asia’s premier trade deal is growing, but first it must mature

Conservation conversation • SANYA

Two passports, one problem • Foreign-born athletes have sparked a big debate

“Zero covid” as a loyalty test • Hong Kong can open to the mainland or the world. Not both

Chasing the dragon • JOHANNESBURG AND NAIROBI

French leave • JACQUEVILLE AND PARIS

The champagne of Benin • How the sugarloaf pineapple joined the pantheon of posh nosh

“RoboCop” hits a rough patch • TUNIS

The Pécresse file • SIGNY-L’ABBAYE

An unfair game • BUDAPEST

Robert Habeck’s odyssey • HALBERSTADT AND TIRSCHENREUTH

A superhero sprouts in Brussels • A Polish climbdown signals a new era of eu power—if it chooses to use it

Old dudes • Even if the Tories switched leader, they would struggle to govern effectively

The shrinkflation state • The British state will soon cost more, yet provide less

The Russian stack • BERLIN AND SAN FRANCISCO

The middle-market corset • BERLIN

Learnings growth • The pandemic has turbocharged the ed-tech business. Can it last?

Writing about leadership • How aspiring management gurus can stand out in a crowded field

Cyber-rattling • Companies have a lot to fear from Russia’s digital warmongering

The battle of the markups • SAN FRANCISCO

The true cost of empty offices • Commercial hubs have been hit hard by the pandemic. Is the answer more flats and festivals?

The Citi that was never finished • NEW YORK

Punting profits • An exchange makes progress with regulators as event-betting markets look to join the financial mainstream

Behold the CrypSPACtaur • Are financial crossbreeds monstrosities or labradoodles?

The wonks’ weapons • A new history of sanctions has unsettling lessons for today

Ad astra, on the cheap • SpaceX hopes its monstrous, dirt-cheap Starship will revolutionise space travel

Cloning vaccine factories • BioNTech...


Expand title description text

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The world this week • To 6am GMT February 17th 2022

Putin’s botched job • Whether he invades Ukraine or backs down, Russia’s autocratic president has harmed his country

The chicken and the peg • Workers have the most to lose from a wage-price spiral

No, Canada • Justin Trudeau has handled vaccine protests atrociously

Factional dissipation • The malaise at the heart of the Conservatives

An injection of reality • To build a vaccine industry, Africa must embrace the private sector

Letters

A grim look out • MOSCOW

Watching the border • LOW EARTH ORBIT

Between a rock and a hard place • OROVADA, NEVADA

Total recall • SAN FRANCISCO

Going overboard • SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA

Not yet signed, sealed or delivered • ELMORE, VERMONT

Hard-tech heartland • CHICAGO

The fight for Catholic America • Pope Francis is starting to get a grip on the world’s fourth-biggest Catholic country

No truck with Trudeau • OTTAWA

The mansion and the first son • Allegations about his offspring could undermine Mexico’s president

The limits of aid • Humanitarian assistance is no substitute for a functioning economy

Awamori? Go on then • YONAGUNI

A million ways to die in the east • DELHI

Cut-rate khanate • ALMATY

Littoral, but not serious enough • Asia’s premier trade deal is growing, but first it must mature

Conservation conversation • SANYA

Two passports, one problem • Foreign-born athletes have sparked a big debate

“Zero covid” as a loyalty test • Hong Kong can open to the mainland or the world. Not both

Chasing the dragon • JOHANNESBURG AND NAIROBI

French leave • JACQUEVILLE AND PARIS

The champagne of Benin • How the sugarloaf pineapple joined the pantheon of posh nosh

“RoboCop” hits a rough patch • TUNIS

The Pécresse file • SIGNY-L’ABBAYE

An unfair game • BUDAPEST

Robert Habeck’s odyssey • HALBERSTADT AND TIRSCHENREUTH

A superhero sprouts in Brussels • A Polish climbdown signals a new era of eu power—if it chooses to use it

Old dudes • Even if the Tories switched leader, they would struggle to govern effectively

The shrinkflation state • The British state will soon cost more, yet provide less

The Russian stack • BERLIN AND SAN FRANCISCO

The middle-market corset • BERLIN

Learnings growth • The pandemic has turbocharged the ed-tech business. Can it last?

Writing about leadership • How aspiring management gurus can stand out in a crowded field

Cyber-rattling • Companies have a lot to fear from Russia’s digital warmongering

The battle of the markups • SAN FRANCISCO

The true cost of empty offices • Commercial hubs have been hit hard by the pandemic. Is the answer more flats and festivals?

The Citi that was never finished • NEW YORK

Punting profits • An exchange makes progress with regulators as event-betting markets look to join the financial mainstream

Behold the CrypSPACtaur • Are financial crossbreeds monstrosities or labradoodles?

The wonks’ weapons • A new history of sanctions has unsettling lessons for today

Ad astra, on the cheap • SpaceX hopes its monstrous, dirt-cheap Starship will revolutionise space travel

Cloning vaccine factories • BioNTech...


Expand title description text