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The Economist

Jan 29 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus data • To 6am GMT January 27th 2022

The world this week

Russia’s roulette • A war in Ukraine would have terrible consequences, especially for Russia

A turning point • The era of free money is coming to an end. That means financial volatility and economic uncertainty

Out of mind • One year on from the coup, the country is at risk of being forgotten

All-consuming • Competition policy should protect consumers, not anyone else. But it should do so more competently

Oregon’s trailblazing • Psychedelic therapy shows great promise. More states should legalise it

Letters

Place your bets • KYIV AND LONDON

Exit left • NEW YORK

New sheriff in town • JAMAICA, QUEENS

Capitol gains • Allegations of insider trading spur vigorous new efforts to stop it

Playing for high stakes • HAWAIIAN GARDENS, CALIFORNIA

The politics of death • FARMINGTON, CONNECTICUT

Turn on, tune in • PORTLAND, OREGON

Environmental justice in the balance • The case for pursuing civil rights and climate policy in tandem has been oversold

Mad existence • BUENOS AIRES

Talk talk • SÃO PAULO

The bear in the Caribbean • Russia has become a crucial ally of Nicolás Maduro’s regime in Venezuela

The enemy of my enemy • SINGAPORE

Khyber crevasse • Afghans are more pessimistic about their future than ever

Kazakhifying Kazakhstan • ALMATY

Put down your truncheons • Bangladesh shows that sanctions really can improve respect for human rights

Faster, higher, bossier • China is determined that the games will go smoothly

How China sees war in Ukraine • Shared hostility to America makes China close to Russia, but wary

The juntas and the hunted • OUAGADOUGOU

Market preacher • KAMPALA

UAVs over the UAE • DUBAI

Jailhouse rocked • DUBAI

Lockdown love • MEDINA

Putin’s energy weapon • How will Europe cope if Russia cuts off its gas?

Misplaced sympathy • BERLIN

Lockdown knockdown • While covid raged, famous European buildings were demolished

Road-testing the French dream • SAINT-BRICE-SOUS-FORÊT

The mess without • Peace and order reign in the eu, but seldom near it

Yes man • An inability to say No has led the prime minister to this parlous moment

Buzzkill • The Bank of England is determined to prevent a wage-price spiral

Wrecking ball • Britain’s political pendulum is due a swing away from excitement and towards boredom

Game of chiplomacy • The West and its allies are trying to set rules for the world’s most complex supply chains—without China dominating the show. It isn’t easy

Rewebbing the net • SAN FRANCISCO

Going codeless • Firms are letting all workers write software, not just the geek elite

More pain, no gain • Why supply-chain problems aren’t going away

Purpose and the employee • Some people want to change the world. But not everyone

Party on • Busts follow booms in the chip business. Governments may make things worse

The greening of steel • Lakshmi Mittal transformed an industry. His son has a tougher task

Forward in fear • The reasons behind the current bout of stockmarket turmoil

Material moves • NEW YORK

Acquired immunity? • SAN FRANCISCO

Rescue mission •...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus data • To 6am GMT January 27th 2022

The world this week

Russia’s roulette • A war in Ukraine would have terrible consequences, especially for Russia

A turning point • The era of free money is coming to an end. That means financial volatility and economic uncertainty

Out of mind • One year on from the coup, the country is at risk of being forgotten

All-consuming • Competition policy should protect consumers, not anyone else. But it should do so more competently

Oregon’s trailblazing • Psychedelic therapy shows great promise. More states should legalise it

Letters

Place your bets • KYIV AND LONDON

Exit left • NEW YORK

New sheriff in town • JAMAICA, QUEENS

Capitol gains • Allegations of insider trading spur vigorous new efforts to stop it

Playing for high stakes • HAWAIIAN GARDENS, CALIFORNIA

The politics of death • FARMINGTON, CONNECTICUT

Turn on, tune in • PORTLAND, OREGON

Environmental justice in the balance • The case for pursuing civil rights and climate policy in tandem has been oversold

Mad existence • BUENOS AIRES

Talk talk • SÃO PAULO

The bear in the Caribbean • Russia has become a crucial ally of Nicolás Maduro’s regime in Venezuela

The enemy of my enemy • SINGAPORE

Khyber crevasse • Afghans are more pessimistic about their future than ever

Kazakhifying Kazakhstan • ALMATY

Put down your truncheons • Bangladesh shows that sanctions really can improve respect for human rights

Faster, higher, bossier • China is determined that the games will go smoothly

How China sees war in Ukraine • Shared hostility to America makes China close to Russia, but wary

The juntas and the hunted • OUAGADOUGOU

Market preacher • KAMPALA

UAVs over the UAE • DUBAI

Jailhouse rocked • DUBAI

Lockdown love • MEDINA

Putin’s energy weapon • How will Europe cope if Russia cuts off its gas?

Misplaced sympathy • BERLIN

Lockdown knockdown • While covid raged, famous European buildings were demolished

Road-testing the French dream • SAINT-BRICE-SOUS-FORÊT

The mess without • Peace and order reign in the eu, but seldom near it

Yes man • An inability to say No has led the prime minister to this parlous moment

Buzzkill • The Bank of England is determined to prevent a wage-price spiral

Wrecking ball • Britain’s political pendulum is due a swing away from excitement and towards boredom

Game of chiplomacy • The West and its allies are trying to set rules for the world’s most complex supply chains—without China dominating the show. It isn’t easy

Rewebbing the net • SAN FRANCISCO

Going codeless • Firms are letting all workers write software, not just the geek elite

More pain, no gain • Why supply-chain problems aren’t going away

Purpose and the employee • Some people want to change the world. But not everyone

Party on • Busts follow booms in the chip business. Governments may make things worse

The greening of steel • Lakshmi Mittal transformed an industry. His son has a tougher task

Forward in fear • The reasons behind the current bout of stockmarket turmoil

Material moves • NEW YORK

Acquired immunity? • SAN FRANCISCO

Rescue mission •...


Expand title description text