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The Economist

Oct 23 2021
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus data • To 6am GMT October 21st 2021

The world this week

Instant economics • A real-time revolution in economics could make the world better off

The crime scene at the heart of Africa • Insurgency, secessionism and banditry threaten Nigeria. The government should wake up

Don’t jump the gun • The Bank of England should not raise interest rates until 2022

An October revolution • A backlash against bad government in eastern Europe is at last under way

Be swift, be bold • If Western countries and firms want to stay in charge of global money flows, they have to modernise how they happen

Letters

The real-time revolution • SALINA, KANSAS

Striketober • LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA

Race and class • WASHINGTON, DC

Considering the lobster • PORTLAND, MAINE

Toying with the nanny state • California’s approach to gendered toy displays says a lot about the state’s politics

Devious licks • TikTok had an opportunity improve on older networks. It has not taken it

Oregone • BURNS, OREGON

Reconstructing America • On the failed promises and quiet successes of America’s most propagandised decade

Jobs for the comrades • LIMA

President anti-vaxxer • SAO PAULO

Not ageing gracefully • VERACRUZ

From gulag to ordinary grumbles • TASHKENT

More extreme than the extremists • ISLAMABAD

Valley of fear • DELHI AND SRINAGAR

Outside job • A new law designed to prevent foreign meddling could muzzle civil society

Learning how to be happy again • Restarting Asian tourism will be harder than shutting it down

Poetry from the gulag • NEW YORK

Glide and seek • Taking the nuclear arms race to orbit

The Communist Party’s confidence • A revealing visit to a rural county that gets help from the foreign ministry

When things fall apart • ABUJA AND ENUGU

Capital cities • KAMPALA

Probing too deep • DUBAI

Andy Warhol and the ayatollahs • Impressive collections of Western art can still be viewed in Tehran

Winter is coming • PAVLOPIL

The unexpected challenger • BERLIN

Liberty lady • MADRID

Green-lit • BERLIN

Trouble and knife • A patchwork of conflicting laws across Europe is causing a muddle

A court of kings • The European Council hands leaders too much power

Ready for a leap in the dark • Why the Bank of England is looking unusually hawkish

Making a pig’s ear of it • The government belatedly tries to prevent a porcine tragedy

A great parliamentarian • The death of Sir David Amess holds lessons for British politics. So does his life

Heated debates • Broken promises, energy shortages and covid-19 will hamper COP26

The third star • Having conquered smartphones and memory chips, the South Korean giant wants to dominate cutting-edge microprocessors

About-face • A rumoured name-change reflects ambition—and weakness

Why mission statements matter • Investors can learn a lot from the way that companies describe their goals

The hydrogen rush • All manner of industries are staking a claim to the gaseous promised land

Awaiting electrocution • HONG KONG

Let a hundred flowers bloom • Huawei should dissolve, disperse and seed China’s high-tech future

From the sublime to the subpar •...


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English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus data • To 6am GMT October 21st 2021

The world this week

Instant economics • A real-time revolution in economics could make the world better off

The crime scene at the heart of Africa • Insurgency, secessionism and banditry threaten Nigeria. The government should wake up

Don’t jump the gun • The Bank of England should not raise interest rates until 2022

An October revolution • A backlash against bad government in eastern Europe is at last under way

Be swift, be bold • If Western countries and firms want to stay in charge of global money flows, they have to modernise how they happen

Letters

The real-time revolution • SALINA, KANSAS

Striketober • LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA

Race and class • WASHINGTON, DC

Considering the lobster • PORTLAND, MAINE

Toying with the nanny state • California’s approach to gendered toy displays says a lot about the state’s politics

Devious licks • TikTok had an opportunity improve on older networks. It has not taken it

Oregone • BURNS, OREGON

Reconstructing America • On the failed promises and quiet successes of America’s most propagandised decade

Jobs for the comrades • LIMA

President anti-vaxxer • SAO PAULO

Not ageing gracefully • VERACRUZ

From gulag to ordinary grumbles • TASHKENT

More extreme than the extremists • ISLAMABAD

Valley of fear • DELHI AND SRINAGAR

Outside job • A new law designed to prevent foreign meddling could muzzle civil society

Learning how to be happy again • Restarting Asian tourism will be harder than shutting it down

Poetry from the gulag • NEW YORK

Glide and seek • Taking the nuclear arms race to orbit

The Communist Party’s confidence • A revealing visit to a rural county that gets help from the foreign ministry

When things fall apart • ABUJA AND ENUGU

Capital cities • KAMPALA

Probing too deep • DUBAI

Andy Warhol and the ayatollahs • Impressive collections of Western art can still be viewed in Tehran

Winter is coming • PAVLOPIL

The unexpected challenger • BERLIN

Liberty lady • MADRID

Green-lit • BERLIN

Trouble and knife • A patchwork of conflicting laws across Europe is causing a muddle

A court of kings • The European Council hands leaders too much power

Ready for a leap in the dark • Why the Bank of England is looking unusually hawkish

Making a pig’s ear of it • The government belatedly tries to prevent a porcine tragedy

A great parliamentarian • The death of Sir David Amess holds lessons for British politics. So does his life

Heated debates • Broken promises, energy shortages and covid-19 will hamper COP26

The third star • Having conquered smartphones and memory chips, the South Korean giant wants to dominate cutting-edge microprocessors

About-face • A rumoured name-change reflects ambition—and weakness

Why mission statements matter • Investors can learn a lot from the way that companies describe their goals

The hydrogen rush • All manner of industries are staking a claim to the gaseous promised land

Awaiting electrocution • HONG KONG

Let a hundred flowers bloom • Huawei should dissolve, disperse and seed China’s high-tech future

From the sublime to the subpar •...


Expand title description text